A character analysis of thomas hardys the return of the native

Yeobright, a mistake that leads to the older woman's death--and mistaken perceptions.

Return of the native analysis

There are a number of significant couplings within The Return of the Native. It is difficult to accept whatever rationalization she makes for doing away with herself. Thematically, however, the novel is original and ingenious: not trusting perceptions, the book questions moral and ethical truths, implying the superiority of relative to absolute truth. Eustacia can't understand why a man who has lived in Paris, the center, to her, of all that is desirable, should choose to return to Egdon. Any subject. He is meant to be, in other words, a modern man: able to understand but unable to act decisively. Get your price writers online The Victorian novel often focuses on prominent, relevant issues of the time during which it is written. Both women feel that they have an almost magnetic appeal to their male companions, and view the relationship as a game. The heath proves physically and psychologically important throughout the novel: characters are defined by their relation to the heath, and the weather patterns of the heath even reflect the inner dramas of the characters. These issues can range from class, ambition, and gender to love, sexuality, and desire. Clym's eventual near- blindness reflects a kind of deeper internal blindness that afflicts all the main characters in the novel: they do not recognize the truth about each other.

This is not, however, the way the novel was first conceived; Hardy was forced to give the novel a happy ending in order to please the Victorian public.

With its extensive narrative description, abundant classical and scriptural references and stylized dialogue, the book adheres closely to the high Victorian style.

mrs yeobright

Given the tragedy of the double drowning, it seems impossible that the novel could end happily. Vocal in her condemnation of Destiny, Eustacia is an active demonstration of Hardy's theme in the novel. She vows to form a relationship with Clym, and succeeds in marrying him.

The return of the native themes

Both Damon and Eustacia are volatile and emotional characters, and seem to spend much of the novel acting on whims and attempting to make each other jealous. Clym's eventual near- blindness reflects a kind of deeper internal blindness that afflicts all the main characters in the novel: they do not recognize the truth about each other. Throughout the novel, he wavers back and forth between Thomasin and Eustacia, using each as a tool to make the other jealous. It is difficult to accept whatever rationalization she makes for doing away with herself. This is not, however, the way the novel was first conceived; Hardy was forced to give the novel a happy ending in order to please the Victorian public. Her view of life is as foreign to the heath as her person: "in Eustacia's brain were juxtaposed the strangest assortment of ideas, from old time and from new. There are a number of significant couplings within The Return of the Native. Hardy intended Clym to be, but Eustacia succeeds in upstaging him most of the time. He then gives up worldly success for what he thinks of as a more important calling on his native ground. Both women feel that they have an almost magnetic appeal to their male companions, and view the relationship as a game. As a modern novelist, however, Hardy does much more than simply depict the commonality of these types of relationships; he also explores the effects of modernity on each coupling, as well as offering a portrayal of a modern couple whose union is based on love and respect. Since the modernist movement at the beginning of the 20th century, literature has tended to pose questions rather than define answers.

Your time is important. His delay in trying to establish contact with his mother after his marriage is repeated in his hesitating to ask Eustacia to come back to him. All of the novel's characters prove themselves deeply flawed, or--at the very least--of ambiguous motivation.

The return of the native characters

For Clym, the heath is beautiful; for Eustacia, it is hateful. Paul and remarks that the qualities summed up in this allusion hardly make him a good companion. He had a conviction that the want of most men was knowledge of a sort which brings wisdom rather than affluence. Because of the prevalence of these issues in the Victorian novel, authors often have overlapping views and insights. But he will persist; in fact, Hardy may be indicating that he is more persistent even as he is more strongly opposed. His delay in trying to establish contact with his mother after his marriage is repeated in his hesitating to ask Eustacia to come back to him. Certainly some of the descriptive details Hardy uses about her suggest this: for example, the way in which she takes pleasure from having her hair caressed, either when brushed or when she accidentally walks under a bush and it touches her hair. Given the tragedy of the double drowning, it seems impossible that the novel could end happily. The novel seems to privilege a bleak understanding of human nature. Unlike Clym, whom the heath folk can at least fathom in part, Eustacia is beyond their comprehension. I am sure, say what you will, that I must marry Diggory, if I marry at all. In this relationship, both Eustacia and Damon are motivated not by love, but by a desire to possess one another, to exert their control over each other.

Eustacia and Clym misunderstand each other's motives and true ambitions; Venn remains a mystery; Wildeve deceives Thomasin, Eustacia and Clym. Perhaps the most ambiguous aspect of the novel is its ending.

the return of the native summary
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Clym (Clement) Yeobright