An analysis of the clod and the pebble by william blake

This is why William Blake suggests hell can be made into heaven.

The lamb william blake analysis

The Christian Bible consists of the Old Testament scriptures inherited from Judaism, together with the New Testament, drawn from writings produced from c. The third stanza, as we will see, defines love as a selfish act. His perspective of love seems almost religious, with how pure and innocent his ideas are, and is further cemented as a religious perspective due to the fact that this love, "builds a Heaven…," and also since it comes from a clod made of clay, which represents the medium god supposedly used to create man. Readers might therefore anticipate an opinion to match the more appealing nature of the pebble. In hopeless situations and despair, love can be the saving grace, the silver lining behind the dark cloud — it is the antithesis of the evils in life, the creator of home. Nonetheless, the poem does not allow the reader to side completely with the Clod and its view of love. It is hard, it has a definite shape and nothing can crush it underfoot. It is not nearly as jubilant. The second stanza is a pivot between these two views. Love does not try to please itself. Even the Clod's Heaven is built on the despair of Hell, thus "taking" from another in order to increase.

The poem is written in three stanzas. The third stanza, as we will see, defines love as a selfish act.

the clod and the pebble genius

He has a different point of view from the Clod. We can find two participants and maybe we can say that the Clod is a female and the Pebble is a male. The Clod and the Pebble was part of the Songs of Innocence and Experience which presented opposing views without the poet taking sides.

Instead, it is about finding the right balance between Innocence and Experience. He sings that "Love seeketh not itself to please, Nor for itself hath any care", indicating to us that he thinks love is selfless and that a lover would do many things just to please the people he loves.

We hope it stimulates you to find your own interpretation. Nonetheless, the poem does not allow the reader to side completely with the Clod and its view of love. It is a basic disagreement, a reply.

The clod and the pebble questions and answers

But sometimes it does not depends on you. The theme of the poem is the two contrasting sides of love represented by a clod and a pebble. The Pebble is hard. The pebble warbles his verse about love, "But a Pebble in the brook Warbled out these meters met". As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away. If you love someone, then you should want to do things for them. A major division of type or style in an art-form. The pebble lives in a brook; containing clean, clear water. This would turn all of us into docile slaves a the mercy of others. This is why the pebble is so self-centered. The pebble on the contrary is hard and has a clear shape. While objects are expressed to have these beliefs, they represent humans who share similar mentalities. He suggests that love contains the seeds of Innocence and of Experience. We often expect so much of the person we love. Blake was a poet, painter and a printmaker.

It may seem hard to associate this noble idea of love with something as unattractive as a clod of clay. It is hard, it has a definite shape and nothing can crush it underfoot.

Imagine that The Clod and The Pebble were an old fashioned scale.

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A Short Analysis of William Blake’s ‘The Clod and the Pebble’